DiscNW Community Bulletin Boards

You are not logged in.

  • Index
  •  » Youth Ultimate
  •  » Parents and coaches: Nurse researching ADD/ADHD symptoms and Ultimate

#1 2010-06-21 08:30 pm

dulcinea_discs
Blade
From: Seattle
Registered: 2007-03-07
Posts: 7

Parents and coaches: Nurse researching ADD/ADHD symptoms and Ultimate

PARENT AND YOUTH PARTICIPANTS WANTED FOR NURSING STUDY!

Dear parents and coaches of youth ultimate players entering grades 6-9,

I am a graduate student in Advanced Community/Public Health Nursing at Seattle University, and also work part-time as a psychiatric nurse for children.

For my thesis, which has been approved by Seattle University's Institutional Review Board and is officially supported by Disc NW Youth Ultimate programs and USA Ultimate (formerly UPA), I want to learn about the experiences of children with symptoms of inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity who play Ultimate, and the experiences of their parents with their child’s participation in Ultimate.  I was introduced to Ultimate four years ago, and want to look at it from an academic perspective, particularly related to its uniqueness as a team sport that depends on players to regulate competition with “Spirit of the Game™”.  Your participation will help nurses and other health care professionals, as well as the general public, better understand what it is like to experience symptoms of ADD/ADHD, and what it is like for kids with these symptoms to play Ultimate.

If your child will be entering grade 6, 7, 8, or 9 this fall and you and your child are interested in talking to me for one hour or less about your personal experiences with your child’s symptoms of inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity and participation in Ultimate, please send me an email (address provided below) and I will give you more information and arrange for you to sign a consent form and meet for interviewing.  An official diagnosis of ADD or ADHD is not necessary.  Your child will also be asked to sign an assent form prior to interviewing.  Each participant will receive a new Ultimate disc as thanks for taking part in the study.     

I am looking forward to hearing from you,

Amelie Mabbutt, RN
Seattle University
(206) 852-0498
mabbutta@seattleu.edu

Offline

 

#2 2010-07-08 09:12 am

dulcinea_discs
Blade
From: Seattle
Registered: 2007-03-07
Posts: 7

Re: Parents and coaches: Nurse researching ADD/ADHD symptoms and Ultimate

Middle School coaches and parents:

I am still looking for parent and youth participants willing to speak with me on the above topics.  Coaches who think that their teams may be interested in this opportunity are encouraged to forward the above posted recruitment letter to parents of youth ultimate players who just completed grades 5-8.

Thanks,

Amelie Mabbutt

Offline

 

#3 2010-08-04 12:56 pm

dulcinea_discs
Blade
From: Seattle
Registered: 2007-03-07
Posts: 7

Re: Parents and coaches: Nurse researching ADD/ADHD symptoms and Ultimate

Parents of middle school ultimate players (and coaches willing to forward this along to those parents who don't follow the DiscNW forums):

If you have any interest at all in interviewing with me for my thesis project on youth with symptoms of ADD/ADHD (formal diagnosis not needed) who play Ultimate, please contact me prior to Monday, August 9, to schedule an interview.  All interviews need to be completed prior to Monday, August 16.  I am still in need of two parents and two youth ultimate players who are entering grades 6-9.

Thanks,

Amelie Mabbutt

Offline

 

#4 2010-12-01 10:35 am

wynne.scherf
Layout D
From: Olympia
Registered: 2006-07-07
Posts: 1019

Re: Parents and coaches: Nurse researching ADD/ADHD symptoms and Ultimate

I recently received the following message from Amelie, summarizing the results of her study:

Amelie Mabbutt :

Title:  “It gets out the energy and makes you focus”: A Qualitative Analysis of Youth and Parent Experiences with ADHD Symptoms and Ultimate Frisbee®

Abstract

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is diagnosed more often than any other psychiatric disorder among children and adolescents. Research demonstrates that youth affected by symptoms of ADHD are at risk for numerous short and long-term health consequences. A small number of studies have used qualitative methods to investigate the experiences of parents with ADHD-affected children and family approaches to symptom control, but fewer studies have directly engaged children and adolescents to better understand youth perspectives. Recent studies suggest that some ADHD-related symptoms are alleviated by treatment approaches that involve self-management techniques and exercise, and some suggest that outdoor exercise benefits symptom management to a greater degree than indoor exercise. The need for improved understanding of the experiences of youth with ADHD regarding symptoms and symptom management prompted this phenomenological study with youth affected by symptoms of ADHD who participate in Ultimate, a self-managed team sport, and with their parents.

Summary of findings

This qualitative study explored the lived experiences of youth with symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, their experiences with playing Ultimate, and the perceptions of their parents regarding these phenomena.

Three youth and their parents participated.  All three parent participants were mothers, and all three youth participants were white males ranging in age from 11-14 years.  All youth informants had played Ultimate for one season or less and all were playing for different co-ed middle school teams at the time of the study.  All of the youth participants most closely related to Group A symptoms of ADHD (inattention).  Only one participant related to all three symptom categories of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.  All three youth were taking methylphenidate specifically to treat their symptoms.  All youth had participated in at least one other organized sport in their lifetime.

Youth and parents perceived social isolation, negative energy resulting in feelings of failure, and parental management related to their experiences with ADHD-related symptoms, and perceived social inclusion, positive energy resulting in feelings of success, and self-management related to their experiences with Ultimate.

There is at least one salient example of how this study’s findings differ from previous research on youth with ADHD. Evans, Axelrod, and Langberg (2004) found, in one sample of 7 adolescents with ADHD, “…they tend to have very limited sports skills, little knowledge of the most common sports, and very little perceived self-confidence in this area. Many described early failure experiences in recreational sports leagues…” (p. 536). In contrast to their report, all youth participants in the current study exhibited high levels of self-confidence regarding their abilities as an Ultimate player and were able to provide a detailed, succinct description of basic rules of the game.  All parents reported that their children felt that their skills contributed to overall team success and were satisfied with learning and having fun with the game, rather than “being the best.”


--Amelie

Amelie Mabbutt, RN, MSN
Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center
Chicago, IL


Wynne Scherf
DiscNW
Director of Youth Operations

Offline

 
  • Index
  •  » Youth Ultimate
  •  » Parents and coaches: Nurse researching ADD/ADHD symptoms and Ultimate

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB